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The Webb telescope captured an image of a region called the “Pillars of Creation”.

The Webb telescope captured an image of a region called the "Pillars of Creation".

The Webb telescope captured an image of a region called the "Pillars of Creation".

In 1995, the Hubble Telescope took the first image of a region known as the “Pillars of Creation” within the Eagle Nebula, which became world famous, the eagle nebula was discovered by Jean-Philippe de Cheseaux in 1745–46, The Eagle Nebula is about 6,500 light-years from Earth. In 2014, it was observed once again, this time with other observatories delving deeper into the region, with researchers providing new details about the region, which is filled with practically hundreds of millions of stars.

The Pillar of Creation is once again seen, this time by the James Webb Space Telescope of the “Pillar of Creation” region within the Eagle Nebula, within dense clouds of gas and dust in this lush, highly detailed landscape  New stars are being formed. The three-dimensional pillars of the Eagle Nebula look like majestic rock formations, but are far more permeable, and are composed of cooler interstellar gas and dust, which sometimes appear semi-transparent in near-infrared light.

The newly formed stars in this image, taken by Webb’s Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam), are view-stealers, with diffraction spikes usually in the bright red color seen in the image, which is seen in the form of one of the dusty columns.  are located outside. The crimson glow that results from jet shocks comes from energetic hydrogen molecules, which are clearly visible in the second and third columns from above in the “Pillars of Creation”, with their activity practically in the image of NIRCam. These young stars, quivering, have been estimated to be only a few hundred thousand years old.

When lumps of gas and dust with sufficient mass form within the pillars, they collapse under their own gravity, and gradually heat up, forming new stars. Ejections from stars still forming within the gas and dust, these wavy lines, like lava at the edges of the pillars, when supersonic jets eject from the young star, form thick pillar-like clouds of material, and sometimes result in a bow shock.

In 1995, the Hubble Telescope took the first image of a region known as the “Pillars of Creation” within the Eagle Nebula, which became world famous, the eagle nebula was discovered by Jean-Philippe de Cheseaux in 1745–46, The Eagle Nebula is about 6,500 light-years from Earth. In 2014, it was observed once again, this time with other observatories delving deeper into the region, with researchers providing new details about the region, which is filled with practically hundreds of millions of stars.

The Pillar of Creation is once again seen, this time by the James Webb Space Telescope of the “Pillar of Creation” region within the Eagle Nebula, within dense clouds of gas and dust in this lush, highly detailed landscape  New stars are being formed. The three-dimensional pillars of the Eagle Nebula look like majestic rock formations, but are far more permeable, and are composed of cooler interstellar gas and dust, which sometimes appear semi-transparent in near-infrared light.

The newly formed stars in this image, taken by Webb’s Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam), are view-stealers, with diffraction spikes usually in the bright red color seen in the image, which is seen in the form of one of the dusty columns.  are located outside. The crimson glow that results from jet shocks comes from energetic hydrogen molecules, which are clearly visible in the second and third columns from above in the “Pillars of Creation”, with their activity practically in the image of NIRCam. These young stars, quivering, have been estimated to be only a few hundred thousand years old.

When lumps of gas and dust with sufficient mass form within the pillars, they collapse under their own gravity, and gradually heat up, forming new stars. Ejections from stars still forming within the gas and dust, these wavy lines, like lava at the edges of the pillars, when supersonic jets eject from the young star, form thick pillar-like clouds of material, and sometimes result in a bow shock.